Dallas poll proves a Hispanic can't beat Perry

As I have been saying for over a year, a Hispanic can't beat Perry much less a corrupt Hispanic. After 15 months on the campaign trial and $10 million Tony Sanchez doesn't have a dog's chance to beat Perry. And the well known Dan Morales doesn't either.

Therefore, a vote in the Democratic Primary for Sanchez or Morales is a vote for Perry. The Dallas Morning News tells the harsh reality of Texas racism. Perry has held a steady average of 51% of the vote for the last year. And Perry has not even begun his campaign. 

The Dallas Morning News just pronounced the The Great Hispanic Theory Dead on Arrival. Amen. Rest in Peace.

CAVEAT: The Dallas Morning News was sued by WorldPeace to stop the Hispanic debates because they are based on racism. Therefore the Democratic Primary section of the poll is highly suspect since Dallas wants a cut of the money to come from the Hispanic only debates.

That being said, the poll regarding the Democratic Primary is highly suspect. Yesterday a poll came out from Survey USA that showed Sanchez at 35%, Morales at 32%, WorldPeace at 9% and Lyon at 6% with 17% undecided. Now the next day Dallas says that Sanchez is at 36%, Morales at 28% and WorldPeace and Lyon at 3% (if the question was even asked) and 33% undecided. This is a rather large difference in the polls. (By the way the only valid polls are the Scripps Howard polls which take three weeks to accumulate data and a week to process. The next poll is due out March 1, 2002.)

The reality is that WorldPeace is getting very good receptions at the Democratic functions, the Party leaders are going out of their way to speak to WorldPeace, WorldPeace's web hits are increasing significantly daily even though he has not made any telephone calls for a month, and the White folks keeps whispering to WorldPeace, "No way Jose." And the Whites make up 90% of each Democratic function, and the Black voters are saying absolutely "no way Jose" just like they did at Prairie View A & M yesterday. 

In addition, this ridiculous Dallas poll tries to make one believe that WorldPeace's promise to allocate half his appointments to women is not registering with the voters, his promise to give the teachers a $2,500 raise is not registering with the teachers and that that Christian Democrats have no reaction to WorldPeace returning God to the schools. 

What is really funny is that tonight at Caldwell County, Morales' surrogate and Sanchez's lackey were advocating WorldPeace's agenda? Why would they do that if no one has been paying attention to WorldPeace? Hello !

The poll is skewed as evidenced by the fact that it did not ask how WorldPeace would do against Perry. Last September, before Akins dropped out, WorldPeace was at 17% against Perry. This is important because the reality is that WorldPeace internal polls show that he is 40% against Perry's 47%. 

But to report that truth would mean that the Democrats should get off the Morales and Sanchez train to nowhere and get on board the WorldPeace train to victory.

The WorldPeace train is gaining momentum daily as people have to consider who they are going to vote for. And there are the coming debates to consider. And there is the fact that Sanchez and Morales avoided WorldPeace in Austin on Wednesday night and in Caldwell County on Thursday night. These guys are running from WorldPeace and the Party rank and file are getting very mad at seeing their inept lackeys time and time again. Especially lackeys who can't answer even the most basic questions because their candidates have no position on these issues.

The poll is great news; a wake up call to the Democrats. Sanchez and Morales are on a trip to fantasy land where they see themselves as governor of Texas.

John WorldPeace
The next governor of Texas
No more corruption. No more Monicas
God Bless Texas

February 8, 2002
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Sanchez leading Morales in poll 
Democratic race for governor close; neither outdrawing Perry 

02/08/2002 

By WAYNE SLATER / The Dallas Morning News 


AUSTIN Riding a tidal wave of campaign advertising, businessman Tony Sanchez has moved his fledgling candidacy ahead of former Attorney General Dan Morales in the race to win the Democratic nomination for governor. 

Mr. Sanchez is favored by 36 percent of likely Democratic voters in a new statewide poll by The Dallas Morning News. Mr. Morales is the pick of 28 percent, and about a third are undecided. 

"You would give Sanchez the edge at this point over Morales, but it's certainly very close," pollster Julie Weprin said. 

With a month left before the March 12 primary, the spirited contest for the right to face Republican Gov. Rick Perry in the fall remains too close to call, according to the survey, the most extensive media poll so far in the 2002 political season. 

Whoever wins the Democratic contest could face a formidable task knocking off Mr. Perry this fall. 

If the November general election were held today, the poll indicates that Mr. Perry would get more than 50 percent of the vote against either Mr. Sanchez or Mr. Morales. 

The Sanchez campaign hailed the results as evidence that its multimillion-dollar TV and radio campaign is working. Morales aides said that despite the withering Sanchez ad blitz, their candidate is very much in the race. 

"The most important thing is that we've seen consistent movement from one day to the next," said Sanchez campaign manager Glenn Smith. "Tony has captured the imagination of many Texans, but he has particularly captured the imagination of Hispanics." 

Jim Moore, communications director of the Morales campaign, said his candidate lacks the money that has fueled Mr. Sanchez's rise but declared that the former attorney general will emerge with the nomination once voters hear his message. 

"The fact that Tony has spent a year and about $7 million or $8 million campaigning to get up by a few points is pretty promising for Dan, who has been in the campaign for about four weeks and has spent $100,000," Mr. Moore said. "He's competitive with a guy who is trying to spend his way to victory." 

Mr. Sanchez, a Laredo banker and oilman who is favored by many in the Democratic Party hierarchy, had hoped to escape a serious primary challenge. But at the filing deadline in January, Mr. Morales surprised party regulars by entering the race. 

Although Mr. Sanchez has indicated a willingness to spend heavily from his personal fortune blanketing television stations across Texas with a flurry of campaign spots Mr. Morales has raised little money by comparison. Instead, he has sought attention by challenging his rival to a series of debates. 

Hispanic vote In The News poll, Mr. Sanchez is favored among most demographic groups especially Hispanics. "At this point, there's nothing to show that Morales has a natural constituency," Ms. Weprin said. "He doesn't really have any strong backing anywhere, even among Latinos." Blum & Weprin Associates Inc. conducted the telephone survey of 645 likely Democratic primary voters Friday through Tuesday. 

It has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points, meaning each response can vary that much in either direction. Among the survey's findings: 

Hispanic Democratic voters favor Mr. Sanchez by a ratio of nearly 2-to-1. The poll indicates that Mr. Sanchez has the support of 47 percent of Hispanics, compared with 27 percent for Mr. Morales. 

Mr. Morales does better among white voters and those who identify themselves as independents, while Mr. Sanchez is favored among virtually every other group Democrats, Republicans, both men and women, across income lines and among both urban and rural voters. 

In a showdown against Mr. Perry, neither Democrat can muster much more than one-third of the vote. Mr. Perry leads Mr. Morales, 53-34 percent; Mr. Perry leads Mr. Sanchez, 51-36 percent. If a general election were held now, Mr. Perry would draw about 23 percent of Hispanic voters against Mr. Sanchez, who would garner 65 percent, the poll indicates. The Republican would do better against Mr. Morales, getting 29 percent of the Hispanic vote. "Perry has the support of the traditional Republican base and is doing fairly well among other groups," said Ms. Weprin. "He's doing well among the less wealthy, educated and white voters. He's not being drummed out anywhere." 

The pollsters contacted 1,254 registered voters for the general election matchups, and the margin of error was plus or minus 3 percentage points. 

As an indication of Mr. Sanchez's movement in recent months, a statewide Texas Poll conducted in December indicated that 48 percent of voters favored Mr. Perry over Mr. Sanchez, at 18 percent. 

Sanchez's supporters In a follow-up interview, Janice Pelzel, a food service supervisor for the school district in San Angelo, said she favors Mr. Sanchez because of his support of education and his business success. The fact that Mr. Sanchez is a successful businessman "tells me that he is successful. If there were a problem with his business, we would have read about it. There has not been any real adverse political storm against him. It tells me that he is pretty clean. For me, that's a positive," she said. 

Vanessa Harrell of Humble, an accountant, said Mr. Sanchez reflects "a fresh voice" on the Texas political scene. She said she likes his commercial touting the need to improve education. "He knows what needs to be done. And he can't be easily influenced by popular groups," she said. "He knows how to manage. He knows how to make money. I don't think I would vote for someone who doesn't know how to manage." 

Morales' backers W.L. Gedden, a retired Air Force officer from New Braunfels, said he favors Mr. Morales because of his history as an attorney general. "I know he's been around a while," he said. "I've seen so many of Sanchez's ads, and I thought I'd just go the other way," he said. "With Sanchez, people have so much money that they think they can just buy a governorship. That just rubs me the wrong way." 

Delores Payne, a former teacher from Clear Lake, said she's a staunch Democrat and believes Mr. Morales' experience in elective office makes him the better candidate. "We need someone in there who has the ability to get something done. At least, I know what Morales has done." 

Staff writer Tiara Ellis in Dallas contributed to this report. 

HOW THE POLL WAS CONDUCTED 
Blum & Weprin Associates Inc. of New York conducted the random telephone poll of 1,254 registered voters Friday through Tuesday. The maximum margin of error is plus or minus 3 percentage points. 

In theory, in 19 cases out of 20, poll responses should differ by no more than 3 percentage points in either direction from what would be obtained by interviewing all registered Texas voters in households with telephones. 

A poll with a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points could have a swing of 6 points. For instance, if 53 percent of the respondents agree with a statement in a poll, that result could range between 50 percent and 56 percent. 

The poll surveyed 645 likely Democratic primary voters, and its margin of error is plus or minus 4 percentage points. Differences in wording, order of questions and other factors can cause results to vary. 

____________________________________

HOW THE POLL WAS CONDUCTED 

Blum & Weprin Associates Inc. of New York conducted the random telephone poll of 1,254 registered voters Friday through Tuesday. The maximum margin of error is plus or minus 3 percentage points. 

In theory, in 19 cases out of 20, poll responses should differ by no more than 3 percentage points in either direction from what would be obtained by interviewing all registered Texas voters in households with telephones. 

A poll with a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points could have a swing of 6 points. For instance, if 53 percent of the respondents agree with a statement in a poll, that result could range between 50 percent and 56 percent. 

The poll surveyed 645 likely Democratic primary voters, and its margin of error is plus or minus 4 percentage points. Differences in wording, order of questions and other factors can cause results to vary.